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  • Locations: Prague, Czech Republic
  • Program Terms: Global Seminar Fall
  • Restrictions: SPU applicants only
  • This program is currently not accepting applications.
Dates / Deadlines:

There are currently no active application cycles for this program.
Fact Sheet:
#i18n(14)#
Program Sponsor: SPU Faculty-led Areas of Study: History
Program Type: Study Abroad Internship: No
Language of Instruction: English Housing Type: Apartment
Minimum GPA: 2.6 Number of Credits: 5
Service Learning: No
Program Description:
 

  PragueBanner

The Holocaust in Prague, Czech Republic
Fall 2018 Global Seminar


Program Overview

The Holocaust, the murder of six million Jews by Germans and their collaborators in Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II, is one of the most central events in modern history. Studying the Holocaust in Prague offers students keen visuals and experiences to understand the magnitude and specificity of this genocide. Prague was home to a large and assimilated Jewish population before the war, and we will tour all the main Jewish sites in town. We will also take field trips to the concentration camp, Terezin, and the village of Lidice, which the Nazis destroyed. Students will also travel for a 3-day excursion to Krakow, Poland to visit the death camp, Auschwitz, and Jewish Krakow.

This class will focus on Jewish life before, during, and after the Holocaust. The main thrust of our study will consider Jewish experiences and forms of resistance inside and outside the camps, and the ways victims worked to maintain their humanity. Students will read primary source materials including films, and will write reflective and analytical papers. In addition, students will keep a reflective photo journal of the physical sites we tour. 

Browse the Photo Gallery


Academics

HIS 3366  The Holocaust in Prague: The Holocaust, Jewish Culture, and Anti-Semitism 5 credits
The Holocaust, the murder of six million Jews by Germans and their collaborators in Nazi-occupied Europe during World War II, is one of the most central events in modern history. Studying the Holocaust in Prague offers students keen visuals and experiences to understand the magnitude and specificity of this genocide. This course focuses primarily on Jewish culture and life before, during and after WWII. We will examine anti-Semitism in Nazi ideology, life under Nazi rule and the machinery of the modern state in implementing the murder of Jews. The main thrust of our study will consider Jewish experiences and forms of resistance inside and outside the concentration camps, and the ways the victims worked to maintain their humanity. The final week of the class highlights the struggles Jewish survivors faced as anti-Semitism remained entrenched into the early years of the Cold War, particularly in the Soviet-dominated East.  Attributes: Ways of Engaging; Upper Division

Proposed Schedule of study (subject to change):

Week 1: Jewish Culture and Life in Europe and Anti-Semitism
This week we consider the place and centrality of Jews in Europe prior to WWII and the rise and spread of anti-Semitism, and specifically Nazi ideology.
 
Tour Jewish Prague: We will visit the old Jewish cemetery, the Jewish Quarter, and Pinkas Synagogue with its memorial for the 80,000 Jewish victims of Moravia and Bohemia.
 
Week 2: Life under Nazism
As Hitler invaded and conquered Europe, he began to implement his anti-Semitic policies. We examine the unique situations that Jews were placed in and how local contexts were critical to their outcome. For example, we consider why 85% of Polish Jews, 30% of French Jews, and 1% of Danish Jews were murdered.
 
Visit to Lidice: In 1942, the Nazis destroyed this village for resistance against Nazi leaders. Many of its inhabitants were immediately murdered and others were deported to concentration camps.

Visit to Terezin: Terezin was a “model” concentration camp housed in an eighteenth-century fortress, thirty miles outside Prague. About 150,000 Jews passed through Terezin between 1941 and 1945, with many eventually deported to death camps. To help us understand life in Terezin, we read Helga Weiss’ diary of her internment and later deportation to Auschwitz.
 
Week 3: Death and Labor Camps
We will study life in the labor and death camps, highlighting the varied experiences of men and women. We will also focus on the ways Jewish victims worked to maintain their humanity.
 
4-day excursion to Krakow: We will visit the death camp, Auschwitz-Birkenau, the museum of Krakow under Nazi Occupation, 1939-1945, and Kazimierz, the old Jewish Quarter of the city.
 
Week 4: After the Holocaust
In our final week, we examine the immediate effects of the Holocaust on Jews, and the difficulties they faced in trying to return home and re-establish their lives. We study the Jewish population who remained in Europe following the war, and the ways that European and non-European Jews have worked to shape the memory and commemorations of the Holocaust.

Itinerary

Sunday, August 19:  Depart USA on independent flights.

Monday, August 20:  Airport pick up at Ruzyne Airport (Airport Code: PRG) for students arriving between the hours of 8AM and 8PM. Students not arriving during these times will provide their own transportation and will be given instructions on how to get to the meeting point in Prague. 

Week 1:  Jewish Culture and Life in Europe and Anti-Semitism
This week we consider the place and centrality of Jews in Europe prior to WWII and the rise and spread of anti-Semitism, and specifically Nazi ideology.

Tour Jewish Prague: We will visit the old Jewish cemetery, the Jewish Quarter, and Pinkas Synagogue with its memorial for the 80,000 Jewish victims of Moravia and Bohemia.

Week 2:  Life under Nazism
As Hitler invaded and conquered Europe, he began to implement his anti-Semitic policies. We examine the unique situations that Jews were placed in and how local contexts were critical to their outcome. For example, we consider why 85% of Polish Jews, 30% of French Jews, and 1% of Danish Jews were murdered.

Visit to Lidice: In 1942, the Nazis destroyed this village for resistance against Nazi leaders. Many of its inhabitants were immediately murdered and others were deported to concentration camps.

Visit to Terezin: Terezin was a “model” concentration camp housed in an eighteenth-century fortress, thirty miles outside Prague. About 150,000 Jews passed through Terezin between 1941 and 1945, with many eventually deported to death camps.

Week 3:  Death and Labor Camps
We will study life in the labor and death camps, highlighting the varied experiences of men and women. We will also focus on the ways Jewish victims worked to maintain their humanity.

4-day excursion to Krakow: We will visit the death camp, Auschwitz-Birkenau, the museum of Krakow under Nazi Occupation, 1939-1945, and Kazimierz, the old Jewish Quarter of the city, and Schindler's Factory Museum.

Week 4:  After the Holocaust
In our final week, we examine the immediate effects of the Holocaust on Jews, and the difficulties they faced in trying to return home and re-establish their lives. We study the Jewish population who remained in Europe following the war, and the ways that European and non-European Jews have worked to shape the memory and commemorations of the Holocaust.

Students will have a day of reflection on the day we travel back to Prague from Krakow. This will directly follow our day of visiting Auschwitz. I will also offer a time of prayer for any who would like to join. We will also spend weekly class time processing students' thoughts and reactions to all of the sites and materials.

Friday, September 14:  Program ends.  Return transportation to the airport will be provided.

Monday, September 24:  Fall quarter classes begin at SPU

 

Housing and meals

All housing is carefully chosen to provide an optimal experience for student participants. Students will be housing in residential apartments with other study abroad program participants. Travel time from student housing to classes at Anglo American University is typically 10-30 minutes. Public transportation to the university is easily accessible throughout the city and students should expect to commute to campus every day.  Transportation passes are included in the program fee. While many aspects of the residential apartments may resemble U.S. equivalents, it is important to keep in mind that housing in Prague follows local and traditional standards and norms.

Average and median size of apartments is 5 students; the minimum is 3 and the maximum is 8 students per apartment. Bedrooms within the apartments house 2 to 3 students, depending on the size and disposition of the rooms. A meal plan is not included but all apartments have fully-equipped (including pots, pans, dishes, silverware, cups, and glasses) kitchens with refrigerator and stove, washing machine, bathroom(s), and Wi-Fi access.

SPU students will be housed together and may request roommates on the housing preference form, which will be available closer to departure.

For more information on housing, visit:
http://www.ceastudyabroad.com/programs/czech_republic/prague/housing.html

Meals are not included, so students should plan for their own meal expenses. We estimate that you should budget approximately $150 per week for meals. The cost of living in Prague is relatively inexpensive and are plenty of affordable restaurant options, as well as excellent markets where groceries can be purchased for meal preparation in student apartments.


 


 

Cost
 
2018 Program Fee $3,700 + $300 Confirmation Deposit (Admin Fee)
Credits 5

Program fee includes:
  • Airport transportation in Prague
  • Local transportation passes
  • Accommodations in fully equipped apartments
  • Three group meals
  • 3-day excursion to Krakow, Poland
  • Day trip to Terezin
  • Tours and activities related to course study
  • Medical insurance for the duration of the program
Not included in program fee:
  • Roundtrip airfare: $1,200 - $1,500
  • Meals: Approximately $500
  • Personal expenses (souvenirs, snacks, etc.) - varies
  • Trip cancellation/interruption insurance - varies
  • Tuition for this course (5 credits) will be part of your normal autumn tuition
Students on the Prague Global Seminar may be eligible for financial aid. Before applying, check with Student Financial Services to determine your exact aid eligibility.
 
 

Booking Flights

It is your responsibility to book and pay for a flight to Prague, as airfare is not included in the program fees to give you maximum flexibility and control.

Please do not book your flights to Prague until you have been accepted to the program and your place has been confirmed by the study abroad office. As a courtesy, we will identify a 'preferred' flight that students may book through SPU's travel agent or on their own. Specific information about flights will be provided in your study abroad account. There is no chaperone to accompany students on their flight(s) from the US, but students will be given a time frame to arrive in Prague and will be greeted at the airport and transported to student housing.

If you choose to arrive early and not meet at the airport at the designated time, you will be responsible for your own transportation into the city to meet the group. We will give you instructions on how to get to the meeting point.

After the program is over, many students choose to stay in Prague or travel independently in Europe. Return airport transportation is included in the program fees, but if you choose to stay longer there are inexpensive options to get to the aiport, and during the program you will be advised on the best options.
 


 

 

Rebecca Hughes

Rebecca Hughes
Assistant Professor of History
Email: hughesr@spu.edu
Phone: 206-281-2773
Office: Alexander Hall 408

Dr. Hughes earned her doctorate from University of Washington and specializes in European history. Her areas of interest are issues of racial discrimination, gender, and imperialism. While her published work focuses on British missionaries in Africa, her teaching field of the Holocaust offers her the opportunity to explore these issues from another perspective. Dr. Hughes continues to develop her expertise on the Holocaust with inernational and domestic research, including a faculty seminar at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum in January 2016. 

Dr. Hughes passionately enjoys traveling and studying throughout Europe and created the Prague Holocaust Global Seminar, an enriching experience that students will never forget.

Education: BA, Trinity University 1983; MA, Central Connecticut State University 2001; PhD, University of Washington 2010. At SPU since 2012.
Specialities: History of imperial Britain.

Research Interests: British missionaries in Africa; gender, race and colonial relationships.

 
 
 
For more information, contact the Study Abroad Office
 
 



This program is currently not accepting applications.